REVIEWS FOR "LONG BEACH CALLING"

Twangville - June 19, 2019:

"What came first, the chicken or the egg. Did Mike Jacoby write songs honoring The Clash and Elvis before he knew about the album artwork connection? Or, did he pen one of the songs after discovering the London Calling and Elvis Presley sleeves? Either way, his latest collection of originals, Long Beach Calling, puts an countrified spin on some of the classic rock sounds that everyone knows.

The title track really is an Americana homage to London Calling, but referencing the LBC, from the container ships in the bay to sitting on Signal Hill. Long Live The King switches between early acoustic to electric roots rock and back again in its tale of Elvis impersonators. Play Like Richards is an unabashed rip-off of the classic Stones sound, with the rhetorical question, would you rather “move like Jagger, or play like Richards?” From the song title, you can guess Jacoby’s answer.

On the twangier side of things, Pine Box is an old-timey banjo and fiddle piece about one of life’s certainties. Your Love Song is a country rock social commentary on divorce. The record actually finishes with a hidden track, Yes But, an alt-country, new wave punk gem of a number. It starts 14 seconds after Long Live The King. Why 14 seconds? That’s the gap between The End and Her Majesty, the famous Beatles hidden track on Abbey Road.

Long Beach Calling cuts a broad swath across much of America’s roots music. The songs are catchy and just about everybody is bound to find a couple of them they like. But if you’re a recorded music geek, you must pick up the CD. Or maybe even better, vinyl, if Jacoby decides to press a few of those."

https://twangville.com/31873/mike-jacoby-long-beach-calling/

VOYAGE LA - INTERVIEW

http://voyagela.com/interview/meet-mike-jacoby-music-long-beach/

Today we’d like to introduce you to Mike Jacoby.

So, before we jump into specific questions, why don’t you give us some details about you and your story.
Well, I’m originally from Upstate N.Y – the City of Rochester to be precise. I moved out to Southern California in 1988 and have called Long Beach, CA home since 1992 or so. I’ve been a musician all my life – and been in and out of many bands over the years. I’m a founding member of the “aughts” era Americana band “Haymaker”; we released 3 CD’s of original music and played tons of shows. Since 2012, I’ve been a solo artist – singing and playing and writing and recording my own music. I’ve put out two CDs of original music and this year I’m releasing my third CD – “Long Beach Calling”.

We’re always bombarded by how great it is to pursue your passion, etc – but we’ve spoken with enough people to know that it’s not always easy. Overall, would you say things have been easy for you?
Nothing in life is ever a smooth road. But instead of thinking about it as “struggles”, I prefer to think of them as challenges. My music is an important part of who I am – and the challenge is to balance that with all the other demands and responsibilities in life.The physical act of practicing one’s instrument – to improve on dexterity and technique is a constant challenge. Thinking about songcraft and trying to write better songs – clearer, more focused, unique….that’s another constant challenge.

I’ve made tons of mistakes and hopefully have learned from…most…of them. haha

We’d love to hear more about your work and what you are currently focused on. What else should we know?
Currently, I’m focused on getting the word out on my new disc “Long Beach Calling”. I’m really proud of how it turned out. “Long Beach Calling” starts with a song that pays homage both to the wonderful city of Long Beach, CA and to the Clash and ends with a song that pays homage to the Elvis impersonator in all of us. In between, there are tales of perseverance and hope; fractured relationships; death; super-models; BBQ Pits and a concise and accurate history of the Rolling Stones. What else would you want in an album?

I’m also rehearsing with the Electric Trio – so keep an eye out for our upcoming shows in the months ahead.

Has luck played a meaningful role in your life and business?
I don’t know… I don’t believe it’s useful to think in terms of “luck”. It’s more important to know who you are and to follow your own path with as much decency and honesty and integrity as you can. Then the chips will fall where they may. For me, it all comes down to the song. I’m always striving to write better songs – songs of experience, songs of happiness, songs of heartbreak, songs of perseverance, songs with humor, songs that chronicle the ups and downs of the absurdity of life. And with any luck, people will be listening!!! Smile

Contact Info:

JP's Music Blog

"California roots rocker Mike Jacoby returns with the release of his third solo album "Long Beach Calling" on August 2nd. It's a homage to the town of Long Beach, CA in the same vein as The Clash's "London Calling." The new eleven song release begins with the title song, "Long Beach Calling," which gets the energy flowing right away with a rockabilly swagger. Mike adds a surf-style guitar to "Here And Now," while "Your Love Song" carries a nostalgic west coast country/pop vibe. Next, he dives into the blues of "Know Right Away," before picking the energy back up with the swinging rhythm of "Hangers (A Christmas Tale)." Mike Jacoby finishes up his new album with the straight up rock vibe of "Play Like Richards" (inspired by Maroon 5's "Moves Like Jagger") and the mellow sun setting groove of "Long Live The King."

http://www.jpsmusicblog.com/2019/07/mike-jacoby-pays-tribute-to-long-beach.html

Americana Daily - June 20, 2019

Long Beach Calling!

http://www.americanadaily.com/2019/06/mike-jacoby-long-beach-calling.html

DC Larson's JUKEBOX JURY - June 4, 2019

Ex-Haymaker Mike crafts reassuring country-familiarity interlaced with arresting alt mind. Intriguing avenues flare up unanticipated in the midst of roads recognizable and favored. Don't loll on assumptions.

Recommended: "Long Beach Calling," "Play Like Richards," "Here and Now," "Smile," "Pine Box," "Your Love Song," "Hangers (A Christmas Song)"

https://dclarsonsjukeboxjury.blogspot.com/

MIDWEST RECORD - June 4, 2019:

A vet roots rocker that has a mixmaster mind along with a sense of humor, this is a cat that can chart his own course whether in homage to Clash or tackling the would be straight humor side of Al Yankovic, he’s that one of a kind artist that masters the offbeat making it seem normal. A must treat for that after hours spots that exists between your headphones, listen to it in your head so no one will know what your smiling about.  Well done.​

http://midwestrecord.com/MWR1533.html

ROOTSTIME - GERMAN

Here's the Google Translation (maybe not exact - hehe):

In 1980 the album "London Calling" from the British punk group "The Clash" was released and now almost 40 years later the American alt.country and rock singer Mick Jacoby from Long Beach, California has recorded an album that fits in a cover that is outright parody is on the original cover of 'The Clash'. The album title "Long Beach Calling" also refers to the record of the punks, but otherwise there are no direct interfaces with the punk music or the rough way of performing the punk rock band around frontman Joe Strummer.

On this album, produced by Mick Jacoby himself, he brings eleven compositions of his own into the alt.country and country rock atmosphere, which is also called "Americana". It is therefore usually about cheerful, sunny and heart-warming tunes that fit perfectly with the current summer holiday period. For the recording of this album he played all the instruments himself, with the exception of the violin played by Ann DeJarnett and the piano behind which Art Bailey Jr. took place. He also often includes humor and jokes in his lyrics, which can sometimes also be very serious.

Nice swinging songs on this album are the title track that starts, followed by rock 'n' roll songs "Here And Now" and "Your Love Song" and the only real ballad "Know Right Away". The fun is contained in the songs "Pine Box", "Hangers (A Christmas Tale)" (see video), "Play Like Richards" which is his parody of the song "Move Like Jagger" from "Maroon 5" and in closing piece "Long Live The King" in which he ironically mocks all those silly Elvis imitators.

In a previous musical life Mick Jacoby was the lead singer of the Long Beach roots rock quartet "Haymaker" of which I was allowed to write a review for "Rootstime" in October 2013 about their handsome third album "Now Now Now". "Long Beach Calling" is now the third solo album by Mick Jacoby and the successor to the album "NorthEastSouthWest" which was released in 2016 and the album "The Big 5-0", which was released in 2012. This new disc will probably not evoke earth-shattering reactions in the music world, but it is an album that you want to keep playing again and again without problems because it brings unbridled joy and joy into your life Often that really doesn't have to be anymore!

https://www.rootstime.be/CD%20REVIEUW/2019/JULI1/CD30.html

 

REVIEWS FOR "NORTHEASTSOUTHWEST"

No Depression Review (Jude Warne):

“Hey – I’m just sittin’ here,” Mike Jacoby snarl-sings in “Nevermind Me,” one of the I’ve-had-enough songs on his recently released album NorthEastSouthWest.  Over the course of the record’s eleven countrified-rock tracks, Jacoby consistently defines a well-articulated personal creed.  Lyrically, the creed is a confident one that seems to denounce and resist the attempted interferences of the album’s cast of supporting characters.  Characters who feel that they know what the songs’ narrator wants better than he does, characters who want to run his life for him.  Consider the aforementioned track “Nevermind Me,” in which the narrator is picked on by everyone from his girl to his employer for merely showing up, for merely being himself.  Consider too “What’s That Got to Do With Me,” in which the narrator is surrounded by three minutes’ worth of fact-lyrics that a theoretical chick or pal is hurling at him, fact-lyrics which point out various injustices and overly-prideful personal accomplishments the narrator does not care to hear.  NorthEastSouthWest presents a musical narrative persona who seems to be done with taking orders, done with being on the receiving end of other people’s personal smalltime games.  This persona’s brand of clarity presumably comes from truly knowing himself, from knowing what he will or will not tolerate.  As a seasoned singer-songwriter Jacoby has earned this clarity and deserves to showcase it as he does in NorthEastSouthWest.

A founding member of reliable alt-country band Haymaker, and based in Long Beach, California, Mike Jacoby has released NorthEastSouthWest as the follow-up to 2013’s The Big 5-0, his breakaway solo effort.  On the latest album, Jacoby has written, played every instrument on, and arranged, produced, and engineered all eleven tracks.  Musically, the record’s creed is a multi-dimensional, well-informed, and beautifully crafted one that incorporates a myriad of genre elements and tonal colors.  Jacoby’s always-impressive guitar prowess seems to have been taken up a technical notch or two since The Big 5-0, manifesting this time as a virtuosic ability to play any and every riff and chord sequence imaginable.  “Talk a Good Game” wonderfully utilizes a complicated Latin-inspired guitar lick, while “Hell if I Know” issues forth spookily moody banjo work.  Certain tracks – “Lay of the Land” to name one - draw on the best elements of fun college rock with energetic whirls of party-inducing guitarring.  “Where She Goes” is the album’s standout upbeat song, a narratively intriguing number that also manages to convincingly create a 90’s rock radio-worthy aural landscape.  The slower and more introspective “Lie in Bed” may be the best example of Jacoby’s songwriting on the record, with lyrics that are at once economic and resonant with emotional lushness.  If comparisons to other artists must be made, they would surely include wry songsmith Todd Snider, Wilco on their A.M. record, Steve Earle during his Transcendental Blues period, or The Rolling Stones during one of Mick Jagger’s twangier moods.

NorthEastSouthWest provides for an easy and enjoyable countrified rock listening experience that simultaneously formulates a mature and confident artist’s statement.  A statement reminding the listener - as the characters in the noteworthy track “Explaining to Do” are reminded – that to feel most alive, a person has to define his own terms and live by them truthfully, according to his own individual dogma.  The best albums are born from this place and Mike Jacoby’s NorthEastSouthWest is no different."

http://nodepression.com/album-review/true-and-new-clarified-and-countrified-rock-record

Lonesome Highway (Paul McGee):

Jacoby is based in Long Beach California and has released his second solo album which takes the title from his birth place in the NorthEast and his current abode in the SouthWest. The album is a self- produced project and Jacoby plays all the instruments on the eleven self-penned songs included here.

 He writes in an American-ish vein, with opening tracks Ready When You Are and Nevermind Me setting the tone with strong beats and a rhythm that sweeps along with attitude. He is clearly a musical talent and his ability to deliver this project single-handed has to be admired and applauded.

There is a country feel to Explaining to Do with its’ swing and swagger and Lay of the Land has a radio friendly groove that will appeal to many. Lie in Bed is a strong track that slows everything down before the driving beat of Where She Goes recalls early 1950s rockabilly.

http://www.lonesomehighway.com/music-reviews/tag/james-houlihan